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Be a Part of Your School Community

July 30, 2014

This morning my husband sent me the flyer displayed below. At first I thought, I can’t put that on my blog. My blog is for professional posts only, but it is my blog. Then I reviewed my lesson for this evening, part of which focuses on the importance of building professional relationships or Engaging in School Culture. I know that my husband’s involvement and decision to chair this year’s Milwaukee Heart Walk, grew out of his professional relationships. While it is for a great cause and a disease that has affected too many of our family and friends, the walk itself will be a fun opportunity to connect with colleagues and friends outside of the work place. Relationships will be strengthened and new relationships formed.

Healthy connections among staff and faculty in the building serve as a model for students and their families. Often, dysfunctional school cultures can trace the root of the problem to poor communication practices, the inability to work together, or the isolation of staff and faculty. Building a community takes intentional effort. By reaching out to others and getting to know people, teachers build relationships.   It is only through positive relationships and effective communication that people trust each other and invest themselves in the community.

(Carpenter, Fontanini, & Neiman, 2010)

That all led me to the realization of the connection to today’s precept. It really is all about relationships, whether in the classroom, my school, my community, or my work place.

Precept of the Day

The nature of relationships among the adults within a school has a greater influence on the character and quality of that school and on student accomplishment than anything else.

(Barth, 2006)

 

Consider organizing a team for the Heart Walk at your school.

heart

Feel free to support the cause in any way. Donations are welcome, but we would love you to join us for the walk.

David’s Personal Heart Walk Page

heartwalk

Barth, R. (2006). Improving relationships within the school house. Educational Leadership, 63(6), 8-13.

2 Comments leave one →
  1. David Carpenter permalink
    July 30, 2014 1:23 pm

    Great blog!

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